Sous Vide "Char Siew" | Modernist Techniques | Forum

Welcome to user forum for all things Modernist cuisine. This should be your first place to come for assistance--or to share your successes and insights--when trying recipes and Modernist techniques. The MC culinary team, as well as hundreds of fellow readers, are here to help. Anyone may search and read the discussions here, but you must register and log in to post. The MC team will give priority assistance to confirmed book owners, but will do their best to answer as many questions as time permits.

Please consider registering
guest

Log In Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search:

— Forum Scope —



— Match —



— Forum Options —




Wildcard usage:
*  matches any number of characters    %  matches exactly one character

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Topic RSS
Sous Vide "Char Siew"
September 14, 2011
10:12 pm
FoodCanon
Singapore
Member
Forum Posts: 7
Member Since:
September 10, 2011
Offline

I am experimenting in using Sous Vide to make "Char Siew" a popular Chinese BBQ pork disk where the pork is marinated in sweet/salty sauce and roasted. The cuts are normally tough cuts like pork belly, shoulder etc.

 

It has basically 3 stages:

1. Brining/marinating

2. Braising or slow cooking the meat

3. Charring the meat

 

I am considering using SV method for steps 1 and 2

Wonder whether anyone here has advice or experience on this?

 

The traditional wok way of making it is documented in my blog here:

 

http://www.foodcanon.com/2011/…..sited.html

http://www.foodcanon.com/2011/…..-blog.html

Terry Food Canon
September 15, 2011
2:34 pm
Max

MC Team Member
Forum Posts: 71
Member Since:
August 7, 2010
Offline

FoodCanon said:

I am experimenting in using Sous Vide to make "Char Siew" a popular Chinese BBQ pork disk where the pork is marinated in sweet/salty sauce and roasted. The cuts are normally tough cuts like pork belly, shoulder etc.

 

It has basically 3 stages:

1. Brining/marinating

2. Braising or slow cooking the meat

3. Charring the meat

 

I am considering using SV method for steps 1 and 2

Wonder whether anyone here has advice or experience on this?

The traditional wok way of making it is documented in my blog here:

 

http://www.foodcanon.com/2011/…..sited.html

http://www.foodcanon.com/2011/…..-blog.html

 

It will depend on what cut of meat you are using. From your recipe, it does, indeed, seem like this is more of a brine than a marinade. If you have a tough cut that requires a long cook time, you can brine and cook it sous vide at the same time. A more tender cut though would mean that you would have to brine it first and then cook it sous vide.

I agree that for the end step, a high heat wok or grill would be ideal.

September 15, 2011
6:29 pm
avaserfi
Member
Forum Posts: 17
Member Since:
November 29, -0001
Offline

Just last week I made some sous vide pork belly char siu. I don't have my notes in front of me, but I took a few pieces of skin on belly, and made a marinade. Sealed the bellies with some of the marinade and refrigerated 12 hours. Into the immersion circulator for 40 hours at 62C. Then I chilled with the belly between two sheet pans to flatten the top.

 

Before service, I opened the bags and cut off the skin then and glazed the bellies with the reserved marinade. A blow torch and a few coats of the marinade to glaze and crisp, then the bellies were put in a warm oven to finish heating through. Served with some bao.

September 15, 2011
7:49 pm
FoodCanon
Singapore
Member
Forum Posts: 7
Member Since:
September 10, 2011
Offline

Thanks, Andrew. Nice photography and recipe presentation :)

I will experiment with SV and eventually blog the results if it turns out well.

Terry Food Canon
September 15, 2011
7:58 pm
FoodCanon
Singapore
Member
Forum Posts: 7
Member Since:
September 10, 2011
Offline

Max said:

 
It will depend on what cut of meat you are using. From your recipe, it does, indeed, seem like this is more of a brine than a marinade. If you have a tough cut that requires a long cook time, you can brine and cook it sous vide at the same time. A more tender cut though would mean that you would have to brine it first and then cook it sous vide.

I agree that for the end step, a high heat wok or grill would be ideal.

Thanks. I using tough cuts and will be trying out the simultaneous brining cum SV way.

Terry Food Canon
September 16, 2011
9:53 am
Judy

MC Team Member
Forum Posts: 197
Member Since:
April 11, 2011
Offline

FoodCanon said:

Thanks, Andrew. Nice photography and recipe presentation :)

I will experiment with SV and eventually blog the results if it turns out well.

Link back here when you blog about it. I'd love to see where your experimentations lead you!

September 16, 2011
5:37 pm
FoodCanon
Singapore
Member
Forum Posts: 7
Member Since:
September 10, 2011
Offline

Judy said:

Link back here when you blog about it. I'd love to see where your experimentations lead you!

I did a batch yesterday. 82°C for 8 hours, using pork collar cuts in the brine. Then I pan grill for about 2-3 minutes on all sides.

Results:

Texture – too soft, fats taste weird and soft

Taste – predictably, the taste is obviously more intense due to the brining cum cooking

Appearance – you can't tell the difference (compared to  wok or oven roasting) after the final charring/grilling phase

If I were to do it again, I may need to knock down the temp.

I am yet to be convinced though that SV way can make a better Char Siew then the wok. There must be some science to it, but the brine cum oil (half-boiling, half-frying) wok method, along with the final charring (roasting) phase produces such good results. And it is convenient – the  meat stays in one place till cooked, along with the resultant sauce. A kilo is done in 45 mins. 

That said, I am sure the Sv method is useful for those who do not have a wok, proper stove or do not prefer the cooking management needed to keep it moist when roasted in the home oven.

Terry Food Canon
September 22, 2011
8:11 pm
avaserfi
Member
Forum Posts: 17
Member Since:
November 29, -0001
Offline

I think you cooked your pork too high. Try to show off the benefit of long time, low temp cooking. It won't be the same as more conventional approaches, but can still be delicious. I finally had time to write up my method.

 

http://www.consumedgourmet.com…..r-siu.html

September 23, 2011
6:58 am
LFMichaud
Montreal
Member
Forum Posts: 228
Member Since:
November 29, -0001
Offline

Nice touch presenting the recipe in the MC format!

September 23, 2011
9:48 am
Judy

MC Team Member
Forum Posts: 197
Member Since:
April 11, 2011
Offline
10

Both blogs' photos look delicious!

September 24, 2011
10:09 pm
FoodCanon
Singapore
Member
Forum Posts: 7
Member Since:
September 10, 2011
Offline
11

LFMichaud said:

Nice touch presenting the recipe in the MC format!

Yes, thanks to MC's approach, it is indeed a very helpful way to present a recipe. I have received good feedback on the new format.

Terry Food Canon
September 24, 2011
10:13 pm
FoodCanon
Singapore
Member
Forum Posts: 7
Member Since:
September 10, 2011
Offline
12

avaserfi said:

I think you cooked your pork too high. Try to show off the benefit of long time, low temp cooking. It won't be the same as more conventional approaches, but can still be delicious. I finally had time to write up my method.

 

http://www.consumedgourmet.com…..r-siu.html

Thanks Andrew for the thot (slow cooking) and recipe. I will give this a try. Am sure it will turn out nice in its own unique way as another type of CS.

Terry Food Canon
Forum Timezone: America/Los_Angeles

Most Users Ever Online: 249

Currently Online:
24 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

puit: 8046

nizel: 7019

kupel: 4627

good.card: 447

shopping_cvv2: 440

bbseller145: 378

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 2

Members: 23346

Moderators: 0

Admins: 9

Forum Stats:

Groups: 5

Forums: 18

Topics: 839

Posts: 2719

Newest Members: kingben, jxf36, Rplnetto, oli_gp, Bonita7066, Duanne

Administrators: Wayt (10), Pear (0), Rich (0), Daniel (2), Judy (197), Scott Heimendinger (23), Scott (4), Krystanne (0), Caren (7)


css.php